It Has ALWAYS Been Ticking.

Timebomb Trading Inc
Words by Jenkin Au
Photography by Adam Luk

Headed by Garret Louie, Timebomb Trading Inc has been bringing in some of the sickest brands since the mid 90’s and some of those brands include Freshjive, Etnies and Emerica. In south Burnaby, almost in the middle of nowhere, there lies the headquarters for this street wear giant. On a beautiful summer Friday, we paid them a visit to chat with Garret about Timebomb. Upon arrival, the justalilhype! Crew was blown to pieces with the artwork displayed throughout warehouse. There are everything from furry animals  to spray-painted murals to classic black and white photography. Even underneath the stairwell was a solid mural of few colours. The warehouse was designed with Mother Nature in mind and we asked Garret to tell us just how much he was thinking of her.

First and foremost, can you tell us about the trip down to L.A. back in 1991? I believe this was instrumental to the formation of Timebomb.

Yeah. Basically, I was a sales rep first and foremost, representing some brands out of Canada.

And this was for Nick Louie & Associates?

Yeah, that was for NLA, the sales agency. We had gotten the surf line out of Canada so I became their number one sales guy. I was really young, 18 at the time, and they were like, “Hey, can you rep this trade show for us? It’s like the big one in the U.S.” It was the ASR Tradeshow and it was actually in San Diego. I went down there as a sales rep and I was handed this flier to go to this party. I was blown away by this party. I was young at the time and the party had a lot of flavour and style. It was actually the first time they brought this party from L.A. to San Diego, so it was really dope. After the party, I was like, “Who did this party?” The party flier had the logos and it was by this company called Freshjive. The party was there to promote the clothing and it worked because I wanted to see what this line was about. The party was so cool and I went to the tradeshow to see what Freshjive was about and it was just a rack of clothing; it was really small at the time. I talked to the owner and told him I was really blown away by this stuff. At the time, in fashion, it was really beach orientated and that was the trend.

Especially down there, eh?

Especially down there. I was more into skate, but this was a street wear brand. This was back in the ’90s and you’re seeing street wear coming out now. Picture the early ’90s, only with the stuff that you see now, like The Hundreds or Alife or 10 Deep. And five years before that, L.R.G.. But this was like, way early, didn’t see anything like this at the time. I was like, “Wow. I’m from Canada and can I buy a t-shirt of you?” I wore that t-shirt up here in Canada and it was one of those t-shirts where people go up to you and just go, “Wow, cool tee. Where’d you get it?” 50 people a day were saying this stuff because it was really bold graphics. Back in the day, everything was clean on this kind of stuff. I called this guy up, Rick Klotz, the owner of Freshjive, and was like, “Hey, I bought that tee off you guys and [have been] getting a lot feedback on it. Do you have a distributor up here? I’d love to do that.” Back then, we were only doing the sales repping. At that point, no one had that brand up here and I wanted to distribute it and that’s how Timebomb started. There are a few things in between, of course, but in essence, you know what I mean?

Timebomb started with four people. Can you tell us how these four people came together?

My father owned an agency and I was working there, doing the sales. I talked to him and said, “Hey, I’m thinking of doing distribution.” We ended up doing the distribution together, just in a small room, for a little while. We basically just did that and it ended up on the floor of a small little room. I was shipping and calling and doing everything pretty much. We had kind of hooked up with a couple other partners that basically didn’t know anything about the street culture at all. We’d done business with them for about a year and the partnership just wasn’t working out. We came from a marketing and sales background and these guys were more logistics and shipping. The partnership just wasn’t working out. We basically disbanded that partnership and I had a stack of orders that we did for the season and I had a video that Freshjive produced. I went, “Man, we should seriously find some partners to handle the logistics part because we need that help [since] we were still running that sales agency. That’s how I started promoting as well because we threw a party for it. We were pretty busy with all this other stuff and basically, my pops was like, “Hey, I know this guy that I’ve known for a long time but he imports kids clothing.” He didn’t know much about the street but it’s the same sort of systematic importing. I met with that guy and I’ve never met him before, but he was my dad’s old school friend. I came up to him with a stack of orders and popped in the video and it was pretty fun. We already had the orders and it was just like, “We need a partner for this.” “Ok, let’s do it.” It was super small for him to do in terms of commitment because it was just one brand. It was just one t-shirt line at the time. From there, it grew into what it is today.

Word. Who came up with the name Timebomb and what does it mean? To me, it’s symbolic of you guys blowing up the scene.

I came up with the name Timebomb, but the funny back-story with that is the partner that we partnered up with is Chinese and he has these superstitions. Our previous companies’ names started with T’s, so the superstition goes, if you can, stick with something that started with a T. I knew that I had to go with something with a T. This was way before 9/11. This is like, 18 years ago type shit. I was just like, “How about Timebomb Trading?” With Timebomb, it’s small right now, not really blowing up yet, but it’s going to blow up or might blow up. We called it Timebomb, but the funny back-story with that is that many years later, I got staff on the road flying from Edmonton to Vancouver and this was like a month after 9/11 happened. They had some boxes with them from Timebomb Trading that they were shipping with them. They basically called our staff by name, like, this guy, that guy, this girl, that girl, up to the front, right after the plane landed in Vancouver and before anyone got off the plane. One of my staff was like, “Oh God. So and so must have weed on them or they caught so and so with weed.” They go out the plane and there are tons of security guards and police. They basically found this box of catalogues that said Timebomb on it. Basically, they were freaking out. They were going to turn the plane around or follow the plane with other planes; it was really sensitive at that time but when they showed the cards and explained what it is [it all worked out]. To this day, we do not ship boxes that say Timebomb on it. All the boxes say TB Trading just because I don’t want things held up with customs and shipping. It’s kind of funny.

How does it feel to acquire internationally huge brands? There has to be a personal connection to each and every one of these brands, especially after living and breathing the scene for so many years now.

For us at Timebomb, and for me, it is a lifestyle. It’s not just something where we go, “Oh, do this for the business.” I DJ’d for over 12 years and skateboarded, snowboarded; I’m into the scene. I’m still going out three times a week, to this day, to the club scene. It’s something that we live and breathe. It’s not just about a business that will make money. How I found Freshjive was that I was at that party and I liked the vibe. At the time, you pick these lines and they’re not big lines. These are lines that people haven’t even heard of. You’re out there getting these lines and you have to bet. It’s kind of like rolling a die but using your calculated experience to say that this is going to be a good line in five years. If it’s hot, then someone else has already got it. If some dude is like, “I want to pick up LRG now, because it’s hot.” Yeah, but it was picked up, like, 10 years ago. You got to be able to find that line first. Some people might pick the wrong line and that line might not go anywhere. There are a lot of factors that go into choosing that line because often, you don’t know if that line is going to be hot. You just have to predict something that’s way ahead of the game. If you’re going to pick something for distribution, and it’s hot, then 10 people would have lined up before you if it’s that hot. As far as how does it feel to have these brands? It’s great because you start these brands and sometimes, these guys are friends of yours and you started around the same time. Then, you grow and they grow so you get to see your friends and business partners grow and you grow with them. You’re seeing their success and they’re seeing your success. They are going from one building to another building until their brand is blown up and you just go, “Rad!” Not all brands have blown up and some of the brands go out of business in a few years.

Yeah I definitely feel that. While we’re on choosing brands, can you tell us what goes on when you’re deciding on what brands to distribute?

We’re really choosey with that kind of stuff. If you look at our history, we don’t take on a lot of lines. It’s more like, do a few good ones and do that to the best of our ability because you want to give them the attention and what-not. You also got to know that these guys are still going to be around in a long time. Everyone has a great idea for a t-shirt line and hoodies and graphics. Anyone can print a t-shirt and put it out there and that’s my line. To really take it to the next level where you’re getting a full offering of everything, from top to bottom, that’s another thing because it’s a whole production of stuff because of planning minimums that you got to hit. The marketing has to be right, [same with] the advertising, and financing. There’s so much going into a brand other than the, “Hey, that’s a cool T. Let’s take that thing on.” I really have to research up on this brand for stuff like, who is he? How long has he been in the scene? How much financing does he have behind him? Does he have what it takes to bring it to the next level? Where is he distributing in the world right now? There are probably a hundred and ten different things, and sometimes it’s just the vibe that you feel. We’re at the stage where we can’t afford to take on any brand and really have the time to sit with them, hold their hand and baby-sit them. If we do a good job and get orders for it, it’s not going to deliver at the end. It’s just going to piss off all your customers and make more work for your company. There are so many factors to knowing if a line is going to be right for your distribution.

Word. And do the owners-slash-founders factor into that as well?

The cool thing about them is that they have had their businesses for a long time. These guys trust me and it’s something that I know. From day one, there never has been a question of, “Are you sure you want to bring on that brand?” They’ve seen where it’s gone and it’s whatever you want to do and anything we want to do, we can do. That’s my job. Their job is to handle the logistics or handle this part of the business. My part is to bring on the brands and make them grow. Everyone trusts each other to do their thing.

What are some major influences for you?

I always give a shout out to Rick Klotz from Freshjive because it was the first line that I got, you know? It was the first opportunity, from being a sales rep to somebody saying, “Hey, I don’t have anybody in Canada yet. Do you want to distribute?” If it wasn’t for him kind of giving me that line, I wouldn’t have started Timebomb. He’s tied into a lot of my life because from there, I threw the first party back then to promote, because that’s what they were doing in the U.S., and I’ve been doing promotions ever since. He was up in Vancouver three weeks ago – we’re great friends – he’s designing a room inside the Fortune Sound Club, the new club. He’s played a big part throughout my whole career. He is somebody who I look up to and somebody that I give a lot of props to. Everyone that we work with, there are a lot of creative people from the brands that we work with, to the people that own them who have their own stories, are always inspiring. I am surrounded all the time by good people so I’m always inspired daily.

So you’re really inspired by real life stories and just people around you doing their thing?

Yeah. There are so many creative people in this biz. You talk to the owners of L.R.G. or Etnies or Sole Technology and these guys have blown their companies up ten-fold. They are creating brands and doing the designing that entails the product. It’s pretty cool to be surrounded by that.

Yeah, definitely. We know the feeling because of the nature of this magazine. Let’s move on to some of the things that are not available to see on your website: the ECO Contributions and the concept and design. Can you paint a picture in the minds of our readers by telling us about the concept and the design of the space?

Right. Basically, we bought this space and it was a dream of ours because we were growing out of the old place. It was Downtown and it was cool and all but I equate it to living in your mom’s basement suite until you’re super old; it was just that kind of space. We always had a goal of moving and doing our own place and making it our own where we can design with own concept. Basically, when we had that chance, why not? Why not start from a totally ECO build. We get inspired by a lot of our companies and one of our companies, you know Pierre Andre who owns Sole Technology and Etnies, produced a movie with Leonardo DiCaprio which was an environmental sort of movie. We watched that and he had done a lot of stuff to his building, like solar panels and what not, and we were just like, “We gotta do that.” Doing our part for the environment would be super cool. We worked alongside our designer – a good family friend of ours – and told her what we wanted to do. She really went off and ran with that concept. It’s not just the basic stuff, like skylights and the low-flush urinals and the T5 lighting, but also FSC grade Forest Stewardship certified wood and the recycled wood look that’s in here now. She took the concept of old and new wood but really focused on using recycled materials, which really tends to be more work to find old wood that can be recycled as viable material. The reception desk is recycled from [the designer’s] fence, literally from her fence. I’ve stayed at her house on the island, and I know this fence, it surrounds her horses. The cool thing about that is that it inspires the staff and everything, like, “Just by him doing that and them doing this, and even the people reading this, it inspires people to do things on their own.” We even did it with the build of the new club, you know what I mean? That’s a complete ECO build as well; we recycled all of those materials. It just starts from one thing and spreads all over the place. By no means are we trying to claim we’re the greenest company out there, but it’s a step in the right direction and it just kind of helps out. I think it’s almost not [giving back to the environment] these days. Right now, it’s something that’s called out but maybe down the road, it’s just natural and normal, you know what I mean? It just becomes second nature.

Of course. It’s just like back then, we used to pee outdoors and wherever and now, it’s peeing in the toilet.

Yeah, well even back in the day when people used to litter, that used to be the norm and people would just toss stuff out the windows. Now, not only do you feel guilty when you just throw a can away in the garbage, you almost can’t even do it! You would much rather leave the can outside the garbage can for someone to take it. But that’s just how long it takes to get to that next level of eco-awareness.

What are some things in store for Timebomb in the future?

We basically want to focus on the stuff that we have right now. There is always room to pick up something new, potentially. At the same time, you don’t want to take on something that will be head to head with what you have, where you start taking dollars away from one thing. Also, we just want to do a better job overall. We just moved within the last year and there is a lot of new infrastructure that we’ve implemented, like new software systems we bought and new UPC codes. We’re just trying to make our infrastructure smoother.

What aspect of street culture do you respect the most?

It’s hard to say. It’s like saying, “Who do you like more, your mom or your dad?” I don’t know. Music is right up there and music will never go away. I think all things base themselves around music, whether you’re into anything or

whatever sport you’re into. Music is my life. I guess my first love out of all the stuff would be skateboarding. I don’t get to skateboard as much but for me, all the morals that I grew up with and that attitude, I live by it ’till this day. All the decisions that I make with my company, I probably base it somewhere along those morals that I have from skateboarding. I personally think that a lot of things started from skateboarding. A lot of stuff revolves around that but I respect it all. The cool thing about skateboarding is that it’s a little more difficult than surfing and biking, so not everyone can do it. It’s kind of a unique little thing and it has a good vibe to it.

What is HYPE?

I guess something that is HYPE…It can mean many things, you know? It can relate to a party, like it was great and it was HYPEd. But at the same time, something can be HYPEd too much, like a movie and you hear about. It’s HYPEd but you actually see the movie and it isn’t that good after you see it. You can put it into those two contexts.

First and foremost, can you tell us about the trip down to L.A. back in 1991? I believe this was instrumental to the formation of Timebomb.

Yeah. Basically, I was a sales rep first and foremost, representing some brands out of Canada.

And this was for Nick Louie & Associates?

Yeah, that was for NLA, the sales agency. We had gotten the surf line out of Canada so I became their number one sales guy. I was really young, 18 at the time, and they were like, “Hey, can you rep this trade show for us? It’s like the big one in the U.S.” It was the ASR Tradeshow and it was actually in San Diego. I went down there as a sales rep and I was handed this flier to go to this party. I was blown away by this party. I was young at the time and the party had a lot of flavour and style. It was actually the first time they brought this party from L.A. to San Diego, so it was really dope. After the party, I was like, “Who did this party?” The party flier had the logos and it was by this company called Freshjive. The party was there to promote the clothing and it worked because I wanted to see what this line was about. The party was so cool and I went to the tradeshow to see what Freshjive was about and it was just a rack of clothing; it was really small at the time. I talked to the owner and told him I was really blown away by this stuff. At the time, in fashion, it was really beach orientated and that was the trend.

Especially down there, eh?

Especially down there. I was more into skate, but this was a street wear brand. This was back in the ’90s and you’re seeing street wear coming out now. Picture the early ’90s, only with the stuff that you see now, like The Hundreds or Alife or 10 Deep. And five years before that, L.R.G.. But this was like, way early, didn’t see anything like this at the time. I was like, “Wow. I’m from Canada and can I buy a t-shirt of you?” I wore that t-shirt up here in Canada and it was one of those t-shirts where people go up to you and just go, “Wow, cool tee. Where’d you get it?” 50 people a day were saying this stuff because it was really bold graphics. Back in the day, everything was clean on this kind of stuff. I called this guy up, Rick Klotz, the owner of Freshjive, and was like, “Hey, I bought that tee off you guys and [have been] getting a lot feedback on it. Do you have a distributor up here? I’d love to do that.” Back then, we were only doing the sales repping. At that point, no one had that brand up here and I wanted to distribute it and that’s how Timebomb started. There are a few things in between, of course, but in essence, you know what I mean?

Timebomb started with four people. Can you tell us how these four people came together?

My father owned an agency and I was working there, doing the sales. I talked to him and said, “Hey, I’m thinking of doing distribution.” We ended up doing the distribution together, just in a small room, for a little while. We basically just did that and it ended up on the floor of a small little room. I was shipping and calling and doing everything pretty much. We had kind of hooked up with a couple other partners that basically didn’t know anything about the street culture at all. We’d done business with them for about a year and the partnership just wasn’t working out. We came from a marketing and sales background and these guys were more logistics and shipping. The partnership just wasn’t working out. We basically disbanded that partnership and I had a stack of orders that we did for the season and I had a video that Freshjive produced. I went, “Man, we should seriously find some partners to handle the logistics part because we need that help [since] we were still running that sales agency. That’s how I started promoting as well because we threw a party for it. We were pretty busy with all this other stuff and basically, my pops was like, “Hey, I know this guy that I’ve known for a long time but he imports kids clothing.” He didn’t know much about the street but it’s the same sort of systematic importing. I met with that guy and I’ve never met him before, but he was my dad’s old school friend. I came up to him with a stack of orders and popped in the video and it was pretty fun. We already had the orders and it was just like, “We need a partner for this.” “Ok, let’s do it.” It was super small for him to do in terms of commitment because it was just one brand. It was just one t-shirt line at the time. From there, it grew into what it is today.

Word. Who came up with the name Timebomb and what does it mean? To me, it’s symbolic of you guys blowing up the scene.

I came up with the name Timebomb, but the funny back-story with that is the partner that we partnered up with is Chinese and he has these superstitions. Our previous companies’ names started with T’s, so the superstition goes, if you can, stick with something that started with a T. I knew that I had to go with something with a T. This was way before 9/11. This is like, 18 years ago type shit. I was just like, “How about Timebomb Trading?” With Timebomb, it’s small right now, not really blowing up yet, but it’s going to blow up or might blow up. We called it Timebomb, but the funny back-story with that is that many years later, I got staff on the road flying from Edmonton to Vancouver and this was like a month after 9/11 happened. They had some boxes with them from Timebomb Trading that they were shipping with them. They basically called our staff by name, like, this guy, that guy, this girl, that girl, up to the front, right after the plane landed in Vancouver and before anyone got off the plane. One of my staff was like, “Oh God. So and so must have weed on them or they caught so and so with weed.” They go out the plane and there are tons of security guards and police. They basically found this box of catalogues that said Timebomb on it. Basically, they were freaking out. They were going to turn the plane around or follow the plane with other planes; it was really sensitive at that time but when they showed the cards and explained what it is [it all worked out]. To this day, we do not ship boxes that say Timebomb on it. All the boxes say TB Trading just because I don’t want things held up with customs and shipping. It’s kind of funny.

How does it feel to acquire internationally huge brands? There has to be a personal connection to each and every one of these brands, especially after living and breathing the scene for so many years now.

For us at Timebomb, and for me, it is a lifestyle. It’s not just something where we go, “Oh, do this for the business.” I DJ’d for over 12 years and skateboarded, snowboarded; I’m into the scene. I’m still going out three times a week, to this day, to the club scene. It’s something that we live and breathe. It’s not just about a business that will make money. How I found Freshjive was that I was at that party and I liked the vibe. At the time, you pick these lines and they’re not big lines. These are lines that people haven’t even heard of. You’re out there getting these lines and you have to bet. It’s kind of like rolling a die but using your calculated experience to say that this is going to be a good line in five years. If it’s hot, then someone else has already got it. If some dude is like, “I want to pick up LRG now, because it’s hot.” Yeah, but it was picked up, like, 10 years ago. You got to be able to find that line first. Some people might pick the wrong line and that line might not go anywhere. There are a lot of factors that go into choosing that line because often, you don’t know if that line is going to be hot. You just have to predict something that’s way ahead of the game. If you’re going to pick something for distribution, and it’s hot, then 10 people would have lined up before you if it’s that hot. As far as how does it feel to have these brands? It’s great because you start these brands and sometimes, these guys are friends of yours and you started around the same time. Then, you grow and they grow so you get to see your friends and business partners grow and you grow with them. You’re seeing their success and they’re seeing your success. They are going from one building to another building until their brand is blown up and you just go, “Rad!” Not all brands have blown up and some of the brands go out of business in a few years.

Yeah I definitely feel that. While we’re on choosing brands, can you tell us what goes on when you’re deciding on what brands to distribute?

We’re really choosey with that kind of stuff. If you look at our history, we don’t take on a lot of lines. It’s more like, do a few good ones and do that to the best of our ability because you want to give them the attention and what-not. You also got to know that these guys are still going to be around in a long time. Everyone has a great idea for a t-shirt line and hoodies and graphics. Anyone can print a t-shirt and put it out there and that’s my line. To really take it to the next level where you’re getting a full offering of everything, from top to bottom, that’s another thing because it’s a whole production of stuff because of planning minimums that you got to hit. The marketing has to be right, [same with] the advertising, and financing. There’s so much going into a brand other than the, “Hey, that’s a cool T. Let’s take that thing on.” I really have to research up on this brand for stuff like, who is he? How long has he been in the scene? How much financing does he have behind him? Does he have what it takes to bring it to the next level? Where is he distributing in the world right now? There are probably a hundred and ten different things, and sometimes it’s just the vibe that you feel. We’re at the stage where we can’t afford to take on any brand and really have the time to sit with them, hold their hand and baby-sit them. If we do a good job and get orders for it, it’s not going to deliver at the end. It’s just going to piss off all your customers and make more work for your company. There are so many factors to knowing if a line is going to be right for your distribution.

Word. And do the owners-slash-founders factor into that as well?

The cool thing about them is that they have had their businesses for a long time. These guys trust me and it’s something that I know. From day one, there never has been a question of, “Are you sure you want to bring on that brand?” They’ve seen where it’s gone and it’s whatever you want to do and anything we want to do, we can do. That’s my job. Their job is to handle the logistics or handle this part of the business. My part is to bring on the brands and make them grow. Everyone trusts each other to do their thing.

What are some major influences for you?

I always give a shout out to Rick Klotz from Freshjive because it was the first line that I got, you know? It was the first opportunity, from being a sales rep to somebody saying, “Hey, I don’t have anybody in Canada yet. Do you want to distribute?” If it wasn’t for him kind of giving me that line, I wouldn’t have started Timebomb. He’s tied into a lot of my life because from there, I threw the first party back then to promote, because that’s what they were doing in the U.S., and I’ve been doing promotions ever since. He was up in Vancouver three weeks ago – we’re great friends – he’s designing a room inside the Fortune Sound Club, the new club. He’s played a big part throughout my whole career. He is somebody who I look up to and somebody that I give a lot of props to. Everyone that we work with, there are a lot of creative people from the brands that we work with, to the people that own them who have their own stories, are always inspiring. I am surrounded all the time by good people so I’m always inspired daily.

So you’re really inspired by real life stories and just people around you doing their thing?

Yeah. There are so many creative people in this biz. You talk to the owners of L.R.G. or Etnies or Sole Technology and these guys have blown their companies up ten-fold. They are creating brands and doing the designing that entails the product. It’s pretty cool to be surrounded by that.

Yeah, definitely. We know the feeling because of the nature of this magazine. Let’s move on to some of the things that are not available to see on your website: the ECO Contributions and the concept and design. Can you paint a picture in the minds of our readers by telling us about the concept and the design of the space?

Right. Basically, we bought this space and it was a dream of ours because we were growing out of the old place. It was Downtown and it was cool and all but I equate it to living in your mom’s basement suite until you’re super old; it was just that kind of space. We always had a goal of moving and doing our own place and making it our own where we can design with own concept. Basically, when we had that chance, why not? Why not start from a totally ECO build. We get inspired by a lot of our companies and one of our companies, you know Pierre Andre who owns Sole Technology and Etnies, produced a movie with Leonardo DiCaprio which was an environmental sort of movie. We watched that and he had done a lot of stuff to his building, like solar panels and what not, and we were just like, “We gotta do that.” Doing our part for the environment would be super cool. We worked alongside our designer – a good family friend of ours – and told her what we wanted to do. She really went off and ran with that concept. It’s not just the basic stuff, like skylights and the low-flush urinals and the T5 lighting, but also FSC grade Forest Stewardship certified wood and the recycled wood look that’s in here now. She took the concept of old and new wood but really focused on using recycled materials, which really tends to be more work to find old wood that can be recycled as viable material. The reception desk is recycled from [the designer’s] fence, literally from her fence. I’ve stayed at her house on the island, and I know this fence, it surrounds her horses. The cool thing about that is that it inspires the staff and everything, like, “Just by him doing that and them doing this, and even the people reading this, it inspires people to do things on their own.” We even did it with the build of the new club, you know what I mean? That’s a complete ECO build as well; we recycled all of those materials. It just starts from one thing and spreads all over the place. By no means are we trying to claim we’re the greenest company out there, but it’s a step in the right direction and it just kind of helps out. I think it’s almost not [giving back to the environment] these days. Right now, it’s something that’s called out but maybe down the road, it’s just natural and normal, you know what I mean? It just becomes second nature.

Of course. It’s just like back then, we used to pee outdoors and wherever and now, it’s peeing in the toilet.

Yeah, well even back in the day when people used to litter, that used to be the norm and people would just toss stuff out the windows. Now, not only do you feel guilty when you just throw a can away in the garbage, you almost can’t even do it! You would much rather leave the can outside the garbage can for someone to take it. But that’s just how long it takes to get to that next level of eco-awareness.

What are some things in store for Timebomb in the future?

We basically want to focus on the stuff that we have right now. There is always room to pick up something new, potentially. At the same time, you don’t want to take on something that will be head to head with what you have, where you start taking dollars away from one thing. Also, we just want to do a better job overall. We just moved within the last year and there is a lot of new infrastructure that we’ve implemented, like new software systems we bought and new UPC codes. We’re just trying to make our infrastructure smoother.

What aspect of street culture do you respect the most?

It’s hard to say. It’s like saying, “Who do you like more, your mom or your dad?” I don’t know. Music is right up there and music will never go away. I think all things base themselves around music, whether you’re into anything or whatever sport you’re into. Music is my life. I guess my first love out of all the stuff would be skateboarding. I don’t get to skateboard as much but for me, all the morals that I grew up with and that attitude, I live by it ’till this day. All the decisions that I make with my company, I probably base it somewhere along those morals that I have from skateboarding. I personally think that a lot of things started from skateboarding. A lot of stuff revolves around that but I respect it all. The cool thing about skateboarding is that it’s a little more difficult than surfing and biking, so not everyone can do it. It’s kind of a unique little thing and it has a good vibe to it.

What is HYPE?

I guess something that is HYPE…It can mean many things, you know? It can relate to a party, like it was great and it was HYPEd. But at the same time, something can be HYPEd too much, like a movie and you hear about. It’s HYPEd but you actually see the movie and it isn’t that good after you see it. You can put it into those two contexts.